Month: February 2014

Hungarian Posters for Movies

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite Movies1Expand

Can you name all of the famous science fiction films represented by these beautiful and bizarre posters from Hungary? You’ve seen Star Wars posters from all over the world and the wild paintings used on Ghana’s movie posters. But nothing is more intense and wonderful than Hungarian posters for imported science fiction films. See for yourself!

Amphibian Man (1962, dir.: Vladimir Chebotaryov and Gennadi Kazansky) – Artist: Sándor Benkő

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite MoviesExpand

(via Múzeum Antikvárium)

2001: Space Odyssey (1968, dir.: Stanley Kubrick) – Artist: Gábor Gyárfás, 1979

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite Movies23Expand(via Budapest Poster Gallery)

Planet of the Apes (1968, dir.: Franklin J. Schaffner) – Artist: Katalin Molnár, 1981

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite Movies(via Axioart)

Fahrenheit 451 (1969, dir.: François Truffaut) – Artist: György Kemény

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(via Budapest Poster Gallery)

Journey to the Far Side of the Sun (1969, dir.: Robert Parrish) – Artist: Tibor Jákfalvy

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite MoviesExpand(via Múzeum Antikvárium)

Signals: A Space Adventure (1970, dir.: Gottfried Kolditz) – Artist: Antal Révész – Judit Wigner, 1972

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite MoviesExpand(via Budapest Poster Gallery)

The Andromeda Strain (1971, dir.: Robert Wise) – Artist: István Balogh

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite MoviesExpand

(via Múzeum Antikvárium)

Eolomea (1972, dir: Hermann Zschoche) – Artist: unknown

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite MoviesExpand

(via Budapest Poster)

Dr. Iven’s Silence (1973, dir.: Budimir Metal’nikov) – Artist: unknown, 1978

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite MoviesExpand(via scanzen)

The Day of the Dolphin (1973, dir.: Mike Nichols) – Artist: András Máté

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite MoviesExpand

(via Múzeum Antikvárium)

Phase IV (1974, dir.: Saul Bass) – Artist: Andor András, 1980

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite MoviesExpand(via Budapest Poster Gallery)

The Big Space Travel (1974, dir.: Valentin Selivanov) – Artist: József Árendás, 1976

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite MoviesExpand(via Múzeum Antikvárium)

King Kong (1976, dir.: John Guillermin) – Artist: Zoltán Herpai, 1984

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite Movies6Expand

(via scanzen)

The Omen (1976, dir.: Richard Donner) – Artist: András Felvidéki, 1989

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite MoviesExpand(via Budapest Poster Gallery)

Star Wars posters (dir.: George Lucas, 1977, Irvin Kershner, 1980 and Richard Marquand, 1983) – Artist: Tibor Helényi, 1979, 1982 and 1984

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A New Hope (1977, dir.: George Lucas) – Artist: András Felvidéki, 1979

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Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977, dir.: Steven Spielberg) – Artist: Tibor Helényi, 1980

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite Movies1920Expand

(via Eat Brie)

Jaws 2 (1978, dir.: Jeannot Szwarc) – Artist: Károly Miklós, 1987

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite MoviesExpand

(via Budapest Poster Gallery)

Alien (1979, dir.: Ridley Scott) – Artist: Tibor Helényi, 1981 and an unknown artist

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite Movies2122Expand

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite Movies(via Budapest Poster Gallery 1 2)

Apocalypse Now (1979, dir.: Francis Ford Coppola) – Artist: Simon Koppány and Mária Hódosi, 1983

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite Movies23Expand(via Eat Brie)

Hangar 18 (1980, dir.: James L. Conway) – Artist: unknown

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite Movies24Expand

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite MoviesExpand

(via Budapest Poster Gallery and Retronom)

Outland (1981, dir.: Peter Hyams) – Artist: unknown, 1983

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite MoviesExpand(via Budapest Poster Gallery)

Android (1982, dir.: Aaron Lipstadt) – Artist: András Felvidéki

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite MoviesExpand(via Budapest Poster Gallery)

E. T. the Extra-Terrestial (1982, dir.: Steven Spielberg) – Artist: unknown, 1983

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite Movies25(via Eat Brie)

The Terminator (1984, dir.: James Cameron) – Artist: L.S, 1988

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite MoviesExpand(via Budapest Poster Gallery)

Back to the Future (1985, dir.: Robert Zemeckis) – Artist: unknown, 1987

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite Movies2627Expand(via Eat Brie)

The Fly (1986, dir.: David Cronenberg) – Artist: unknown

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite Movies(via Budapest Poster Gallery)

Aliens (1986, dir.: James Cameron) – Artist: Péter Menczel, 1986

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite MoviesExpand(via Eat Brie)

RoboCop (1987, dir.: Paul Verhoeven) – Artist: Tibor Helenyi, 1987

The Mind-Blowing Hungarian Posters for All Your Favorite MoviesExpand

(via Filmposter)

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Swedish posters for 30 international films, c. 1921–1939

Swedish posters for 30 international films, c. 1921–1939 Hans Engelska-Fru, 1927 Sweden This looks like the work of Einar Nerman I’ve done two posts on Swedish movie posters for Hollywood films (Oct. 2012 and Jan. 2013). This one features a mix of European and American films. The designer/illustrator isn’t always printed on the poster, but some were signed by Eric Rohman and Gösta Åberg. As I mentioned in an earlier post, many Swedish movie posters from this era seem to play off of the original posters, though designers like Rohman and Åberg have strong styles of their own. The reproductions are from expired auction listings at ha.com. Die Tochter des Wucherers, 1922 Germany Ecstasy, 1933 Czech (wikipedia) “Ecstasy was highly controversial in its time because of scenes in which [Hedy] Lamarr swims in the nude and runs through the countryside naked. It is also perhaps the first non-pornographic movie to portray sexual intercourse and female orgasm, although never showing more than the actors’ faces.” Trollbruden (The Troll Bride), 1930 Sweden Duck Soup, 1933 Berlin Alexanderplatz, Germany 1931 (wikipedia) artist: Adolf Hallman Sommarsol, c. 1930 Sweden (Unknown) signed Lindstrom (?) Heritage says it “appears to be an early 1930s documentary about Swedish farming” The Last Journey, 1936 Great Britain (imdb) The Last Command, 1928 (wikipedia) Love Before Breakfast, 1936 I love Carol Lombard so much. The above one is based off the original poster. Twentieth Century, 1934 Orchids and Ermine 1927 (wikipedia) Mickey Rooney’s first film. Blonde Venus, 1932 artist: Aberg Dante’s Inferno, 1935 artist: Rohman Das Gestohlene Gesicht (The Stolen Face), 1930 Germany (imdb) Erotikon (Seduction), 1929 Czech (imdb) Amor am Steuer, 1921 Germany (imdb) Salto Mortale (Trapeze), 1931 Germany (imdb) signed Lindstrom Topper Takes a Trip, 1938 Hell’s Angels, 1930 Befriad Fran Vita Slavhandlare, 1928 Sweden From wikipedia: “Soon [Harry] Piel received the nickname ‘the dynamite director’ because of his penchant for including explosion sequences in his films. These were authentic: Piel had befriended a demolition engineer who was often commissioned to dynamite bridges and other condemned structures slated for demolition. The engineer notified Piel of these assignments in advance: Piel filmed the explosions, then inserted the footage into his films.” Whirlpool of Desire, 1939 (movie is 1935, France) The Cat Creeps, 1930 The Clairvoyant, 1935 Great Britain (imdb) The Lone Wolf Returns, 1935) artist: Castegren The Man Who Reclaimed His Head, 1934 artist: Fuchs Broken Lullaby, 1932 Gubben Kommer, 1939 Sweden (imdb) Hemliga Svensson, 1933 Sweden (imdb) Curly Top, 1935 artist: Rohman

safety posters from Netherlands

Fifty years of workplace safety posters courtesy of Geheugenvannederland.nl (Memory of the Netherlands)

1926, poster by Albert Hahn
Alcohol increases the risk of accidents

This is a belated follow-up to my April 2013 post Vintage Safety. I tried really hard not to include too many “missing finger” posters. [update: I swear to you that I wrote that fate-tempting sentence on Monday and then totally hurt my hand moving boxes the next day at work. I may never again look at this post.]

 

“Hoogspanning!” means “high voltage!” (see poster below).

1925, poster by Jacob Jansma

1925, poster by Jacob Jansma
Don’t spit on the nuns (Benjamin Peret probably loved this poster)

1925, poster by Jacob Jansma

1925, poster by O. Roland

1928, poster by Herman Heyenbrock

1939, poster by E. Lukàcs

1939, poster by Gé Hurkmans

1939, poster by Strelitskie

1939, poster by W. Poll

1940, poster by E. Lukàcs

1940, poster by Jacob Jansma

1940

1941, poster by Strelitskie

1944

1945, poster by Renes / Jan Rot
Wash Your Fucking Hands

1945

1950–1959
Protect Your Eyes

1952, poster by R. Wormer

1955, poster by Jack de Rijk

1955, poster by Jack de Rijk

1958, poster by Ary Halsema

1959–1965
Put Them On

1959

1960, T. ten Geusendam
“High voltage!”

1960

1963

1969

1973, poster by Frans Mettes

1975, poster by Peretti
Help Reduce Noise

This post first appeared on Feb. 19, 2014 on 50 Watts

BOOK COVERS

Book covers and ephemera from the collection of the tumblr “Jell-O Biafra Says” Joe started “Jell-O Biafra Says” in March 2013 and has already posted 1767 scans from his towering thrift store hoard. Here’s a selection of my faves. (In case you are wondering: “this tumblr is not affiliated with mr. jello biafra…or kraft jell-o.”) Push Comes to Shove (1970) see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says A Survey of Chemical and Biological Warfare (1969) see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says The Nature of Violent Storms Anchor Science Study Series paperbacks (1959-1961) cover designs by George Giusti see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says Two Novels by Nathaniel West (1971 ed.) Cover design by Ellen Raskin see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says Interstellar Communication: Scientific Perspectives (1974) see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says Nihilists (1969 ed.) see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says Iron Men and their Dogs (1941) see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says Threepenny Novel (1960 ed.) see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says Also see my Oct. 2012 post on the rororo series The Sound of the Mountain (1974 ed.) Cover illustration by Barney Wan see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says The Leper King (1957) see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says Britain at War (1941) signed McKnight Kauffer [E. McKnight Kauffer on 50 Watts] see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says Malone Dies (1956) [looks like a Kuhlman] see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says The Human Use of Human Beings (1954 ed.) Cover design by George Giusti see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says Management Thinkers (1970) see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says Discourse on Thinking (1969 ed.) Cover design by Roger Hane see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says Printing (1948), illustrated by Jack Brough) see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says Design as Art (1971 ed.) Cover illustration by Bruno Munari see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says The Last and First Men / Last Men in London (1973 ed.) Cover design by David Pelham see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says The Sioux Spaceman (1960) see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says Birds of New Jersey (1999) see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says Turtle Geometry (1984 ed.) see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says Digital Computer System Principles (1967) see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says Chemistry and You (1957) see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says The Advance of the Fungi (1962 ed.) see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says Automation (1965) vs Automation (1966)

Marine Society bookplate see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says James Scott Memorial Fountain, Belle Isle Park, Detroit (postcard, c1930s) — “different days” as Joe says see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says Feather image representing Kukailimoku, god of war (postcard, n.d.) see the

original post on Jell-o Biafra Says

“Facial expressions in different motivational contexts” from Understanding Your Cat (1977 ed.) see the original post on Jell-o Biafra Says Previously: Stacks of Books Crushing Me one and two See all book cover posts on 50 Watts This post first appeared on February 12, 2014 on 50 Watts

Vintage Children’s Books from Austria (circa 1897–1928)

Franz Wacik, illustrated cover for Wiener Kinder 1. Buch, 1923 See my June 2013 post on Franz Wacik From the catalog: “The first primer to appear in Vienna according to the requirements of the Social Democratic school reform. Franz Wacik, who was commissioned to illustrate this book, was already well-known as an artist. Published in many editions, the primer—its exterior already signalling clarity and contemporary self-awareness—is now considered a key work of interwar primer art.” Most of these scans come from the book Jugendschatz und Wunderscherlein: Book Art for Children in Vienna 1890–1938 (text in German and English; Amaz link). The book accompanied a 2009 exhibit at the “works on paper” arm of the Museum of Applied Arts in Vienna. For an excellent overview of the book, read Helen Chang’s piece for Design Observer. Here’s the publisher’s description:From the end of the 19th century to 1938, many children’s books of artistic importance were published in Vienna. This publication is devoted to this special genre of book art, which at that time ranked in importance alongside architecture, painting, literature, music and theatre. The illustrations of notable artists such as C. O. Czeschka, Heinrich Lefler, Bertold Loffler, Koloman Moser, as well as those of numerous, talented—though as yet unknown—graphic artists are evidence of the variety of high quality works produced. Moreover, the selected children’s books, divided into four chapters (I. From Monarchy to Republic, II. Bourgeois Life, III. The Modern World, IV. New Teaching Methods) can be seen in the political, social and economic context concerned. As part of daily culture, they reflect contemporary realities and utopias, which at this stage are still revealed to children by means of the ‘picture book’. In a fifth chapter (V. Art for Children – Children’s Art), aesthetic developments and artistic possibilities of expression are put into visual form. The historical children’s book in particular reveals impressively individual artistic craftsmanship, and styles and modes typical of particular epochs. Based on around one hundred works, the publication charts not only the history of the development of the modern children’s book in Vienna, but also that of the modern book art overall. A handful of the scans come from the harder-to-find Wien und Berlin: Zwei Metropolen im Spiegel des Kinderbuchs 1870–1945 (worldcat) and a handful from various online sources.

Wenzel Oswald, illus. for Himmlische Mär by Leo Blonder, 1914 According to a Swiss bookseller in 2009: “Spectacular children’s book uniting the work of two artists of the Wiener Werkstätte. This book is of the utmost rarity in any form and has never come up for auction in the past 30 years; we only know of one other copy of the deluxe edition in private hands. $12,500.”

Heinrich Lefler, illus. for Die Bucher der Chronika der drei Schwestern, 1900 C. O. Czeschka, Die Nibelungen, 1908

C. O. Czeschka, Die Nibelungen, 1908 full set here thanks to Mattia Moretti

C. O. Czeschka, Die Nibelungen, 1908 full set here thanks to Mattia Moretti

Koloman Moser, sketch for Jugendschatz, 1897

Koloman Moser, sketch for Jugendschatz, 1897

Wiener Werkstatte Bilderbogen, 1907 (M Jung?) Adelheid Malecki, Mein Herz gehort meinen Volkern, 1913 Class of Franz Cizek, Jugendkunstklasse, 1922

Anna Lesznai, Die Reise des Kleinen Schmetterlings…, 1912 Read a short bio of this Hungarian artist (wife of Tibor Gergely) here.

Richard Teschner, Tobias Immerschneller, 1910, cover Teschner keeps popping up everywhere I turn. See three 50 Watts posts on him here.

Richard Teschner, Tobias Immerschneller, 1910 this image from the collection of Amélie Ziersch

Ludwig Heinrich Jungnickel, Tierfabeln des klassischen Altertums, 1919

Lore Bohler, School of Emmy Zweybruck, 1924

 

Ferdinand Andri, Ausgewahlte Gedichte, 1904 Alfred Zangerl, Zirkus, 1925

signed Steffi Krauss Weihnacht, Vienna, 1922

Risa Bernt, illus. for Unser Franzi by Nelly Goebel, 1908 Lilly Jacobsen, etc., Leporello Bilderbuch Blumenstrauss, 1919 Maria Grengg for Marie Von Ebner-Eschenbach, 1917 Heinrich Lefler and Joseph Urban, Kling Klang Gloria, 1907

Heinrich Lefler, Die Prinzessin und der Schweinehirt, 1897 The clear inspiration for Einar Nerman’s Swineherd. The catalog says these illustrations “mark

the beginning of modern book art in Vienna.” Joseph Binder, Indianermarchen, 1921

Class of Adolf Bohm, Bilderbuch der Kunstschule fur Frauen und Madchen, 1901

Richard Rothe, Das Marlein vom Wunderscherlein, 1926

Otto Schubert, Hoch die Republik, 1928 See the full “Kinderbuch series” of German, Austrian, and Swiss children’s books See all children’s books on 50 Watts